"Where No Fan Has Gone Before" · Futurama · TV Review · The A.V. Club

“The Sting” (season 4, episode 12; originally aired 6/1/2003)

In which it was all a dream… or was it? (Yes.)

It’s fitting that “The Sting” comes after “Where No Fan Has Gone Before,” because the plot—Leela gets sucked into an increasingly nightmarish and complicated stretch of consciousness where she can no longer discern between her waking and sleeping hours, and the boundary between the living and the dead blurs beyond all hope of recognition—seems like it could’ve been a Star Trek episode. Probably not TOS, but certainly a mid-to-late season Next Generation entry. It’s more suspenseful than Futurama episodes typically are; the jokes don’t disappear, but the mystery of why Leela keeps dreaming of the apparently dead Fry is surprisingly engaging, and the final twist is both dramatically satisfying and emotionally moving.

There are plenty of good episodes of Futurama, and a solid number of great ones, and most of them have solid stories holding them together. But those stories rarely register as more than a justification for character moments, gags, and, on occasion, gut-wrenching outbursts of sentiment. Take, again, “Where No Fan Has Gone Before:” It’s a legitimately terrific entry in the series for all sorts of reasons, but “suspense” isn’t one of them. While there’s a nominal villain and a struggle to defeat that villain, the struggle doesn’t have much in the way of tension, and the resolution is, while thematically relevant, intentionally perfunctory. Fry just says, “Hey, you should grow up and stop doing this,” and the bad guy does.

That’s not how you make a thrilling narrative. Don’t get me wrong: This isn’t the kind of show that needs a thrilling narrative to be effective. But one of the things that makes “Sting” so distinctive, and so gratifying, is that it actually encourages the audience to care about what happens next. Not just to appreciate the jokes or cry when we find out what happened to Fry’s dog, but to keep watching just so we can see if Leela manages to figure out what’s going on. It makes for a different viewing experience. So much of Futurama is about undercutting narrative expectations for comedy that when the series does go a bit traditional, it’s pleasantly bracing. (This is also why I think the best dramatic moments land as hard as they do. We’re just not prepared for them the way we would be on another show.)

Everything goes to hell when Leela decides to go on the mission that killed Professor Farnsworth’s last Planet Express crew: a trip into the bowels of a space bee honeycomb. For a while, this plays out much as we’ve been led to expect. There’s a goofy plan (they paint Bender to look like a space bee, and he uses the power of dance to communicate with the rest of the hive), and then things take a turn for the disastrous. It’s a bit more disastrous than usual, though, because when the infant queen bee that Leela (idiotically) tried to kidnap goes rogue, it stings Leela. Fry, diving between the bee and its target, gets a stinger in the gut. Then he dies.

Given how much damage Fry has suffered in the past, it’s a surprise to see him taken out so (seemingly) definitively. It’s also doubtful that anyone watching the episode would think he really was dead, given that the show had been on more than three seasons without killing off a major character, and had never shown any inclination towards that kind of violence. That expectation works to the story’s advantage, because Fry’s “death” is one of the central mysteries that needs to be resolved, even if that mystery is entirely on a metal level. Since we know that Fry will have to come back somehow, the suspense comes in seeing just what that “somehow” will be; and the longer the episode holds back resolution, the more interesting that tension becomes.

And hell, if Fry really was going to die, this is probably how it would go down. There’s a funeral, and everyone’s sad, but we still find time for a joke about Fry’s sexual prowess. (Including a nod to that radiator Fry had sex with in “The Lesser Of Two Evils.”) On some shows, fake-out deaths can lead to a lot of tedious filler in which characters’ grief over something that will ultimately turn out to have no impact on their lives eats up too much screentime. Here, though, that awful out-of-body strangeness that grief creates becomes a central part of Leela’s struggle. She knows something is wrong, but she can’t be sure if that wrongness is just her mind’s refusal to accept the loss of a friend or something more.

“The Sting” gets increasingly trippy as it goes on, and the animation is more than up to the challenge. The various dream sequences all come through in loving, eerie detail, and even if the plot wasn’t so engaging, the pull to see what weird, flowing visual comes next would be enough reason to keep watching. One of the many reasons it’s so frustrating that Futurama would be cancelled in season four is how much more inventive and confident the show had become in its final episodes. The direct-to-DVD movies and the Comedy Central seasons have their moments, but there’s a clear disconnect between them and the heights of this season, as though a certain creative impulse, once interrupted, could never be resumed.

Then there’s the ending of “The Sting,” when we learn what’s really going on. It’s not, as twists go, an absolutely devastating shocker, but it is acceptably clever: Fry isn’t dead, but Leela is in a coma, having been hit with a full blast of bee poison when the stinger hit her stomach (Fry still got stuck, but the poison missed him because it was in the tip of the stinger, and, okay, I’m not actually convinced that this makes sense, but I’m willing to roll with it). Fry’s spent the two weeks since the stinging by Leela’s side, talking to her and begging her to wake up. It’s a lovely conclusion to a surprisingly romantic episode, one which, without confirming Fly and Leela as a couple, still manages to convincingly express the depth of their relationships. Both Billy West and Katey Sagal do great voice work here—I especially love the quiet way Fry keeps saying, “Leela, you have to wake up.” All in all, this week’s double feature showcases Futurama at its finest, capable of the absurd and the sweetly moving without breaking a sweat.

Stray observations

  • Opening caption: “A By-Product Of The TV Industry”
  • Leela: “Bees communicate by dancing.” Fry: “Like my parents! No, that was hitting.”
  • “There’s no law against grave-robbing.”
  • Another Star Trek reference: The song playing as Fry’s coffin is launched into space sounds an awful lot like “Amazing Grace” on the bagpipes, much like Spock’s send off in Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan.
  • “Oh, I made myself sad.”—Farnsworth
  • The “Don’t Worry, Bee Happy” dance number is catchy and nightmare inducing.
  • Briefly resurrecting Fry via royal jelly and couch detritus is a brilliant fake out. Since we know Fry can’t be permanently dead, this is just the sort of crazy, vaguely plausible bullshit you’d expect the writers to use to resurrect him.
  • “It got through, Fry. It got through.”—Leela

Next week: Bender provides source material for real world toys in “Bend Her” and “Obsoletely Fabulous.”

Article source: http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/futurama-where-no-fan-has-gone-sting-222756

Reminder: ‘Pixels’ Lifted Its Entire Plot From An Episode Of ‘Futurama’ – Forbes

It’s said that there are no new stories: that instead we are just retelling the same set of elemental plots over and over again in new forms. Some might argue that there are seven, thirty-six, or just one, but there’s something comforting about the concept no matter which lens you look at it through. It’s the idea that a story is not so much the fevered original production of an artist but more like a human service, as much an indelible and unavoidable aspect of humanity as sleep and food. In this light, it becomes a little more forgivable that Adam Sandler’s Pixels, out Friday, basically lifts an entire plot from Futurama’s “Anthology of Interest Part II.” But only marginally.

Anyone familiar with Futurama noticed it as soon as they saw a trailer for Pixels, striking for how brazen it was on this particular count. In the show, Fry asks the Professor’s “What If” machine what would happen if life were more like a video game, and we get a scenario wherein the world is invaded by video game characters and it’s up to Fry to defeat the aliens and save the day. Save a different exposition and a whole lot of padding, that’s basically exactly what happens in Pixels. The original cartoon is great, but it doesn’t look Sandler’s version is quite holding up that mantle: it’s currently sitting at a 12% on Rotten Tomatoes.

What’s even more interesting is that Pixels actually is based on a different film, Patrick Jean’s 2010 Youtube short of the same name. So it appears that the team at Happy Madison productions saw that short, liked the visual style, couldn’t be bothered to make an actual plot to prop it up and so borrowed one from Futurama instead. It’s an important story telling lesson: just because something works well as a nine-minute Futurama episode or a three-minute Internet short doesn’t mean it needs to be a feature-length movie. It’s a little disappointing that professional storytellers need to be explicitly taught that lesson, but ours is a flawed world.

Those in the videogame world may be even more disappointed than the normal viewer. Videogames have come a long way in recent years, moving from a generally derided geeky time-waster to arguably the dominant form of entertainment on planet Earth, and yet movies like this prove that the old stereotypes are alive and well, at least amongst such cultural arbiters as Adam Sandler. Expect more thoughts soon, but in the meantime, check out Patrick Jean’s short below.

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Article source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidthier/2015/07/23/reminder-pixels-lifted-its-entire-plot-from-an-episode-of-futurama/

Chart: The 8 actors that voiced more than 200 Futurama characters

The futuristic space-set cartoon Futurama built a large stable of characters over the seven seasons that it aired (as well as in its four movies). And 202 of them were voiced by just eight people:

The many voices of Futurama (Phil Edwards/Vox)

Those actors in the main cast include Billy West (Fry, Professor Farnsworth, Zapp Brannigan, Doctor Zoidberg), Katey Sagal (Leela), John DiMaggio (Bender), Tress MacNeille (Mom), Maurice LaMarche (Kif Kroker), Lauren Tom (Amy Wong), Phil LaMarr (Hermes), and David Herman (Scruffy).

Some key observations from looking at the chart:

  • Billy West, the most famous Futurama voice, did several main characters including Fry and Professor Farnsworth. Still, he didn’t voice the most characters.
  • On the flip side, look at Tress MacNeille! She voiced at least 46 characters on the show, but her major character, Mom, is probably less prominent than many others. That shows the invisible nature of voice acting — the most prolific actor on a single show may not be the most famous.
  • The actors with the most established non-voice acting careers voiced the fewest characters. Phil LaMarr, Lauren Tom, and Katey Sagal probably had the most well-established non-voice acting careers. They also voiced the fewest characters. David Herman breaks the trend — he played Michael Bolton in Office Space (1999), but he still voiced at least 37 characters and is more established as a voice actor.

Note: There are some key decisions that come with making a chart so vast. We omitted some “alternate universe” characters like Alternate Farnswoth and Alternate Fry, and we left out Flexo, too. Minor characters are probably overrepresented, and, in truth, a few may have slipped through the cracks — this chart is largely based on the work of dedicated fans at the Futurama Wikia, to which we owe great thanks.

Read more: What 11 famous voice actors — from Homer Simpson to Siri — really look like

Article source: http://www.vox.com/2015/7/17/8989959/futurama-voices-actors

"Teenage Mutant Leela’s Hurdles"

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/futurama-teenage-mutant-leelas-hurdles-why-fry-222382

Post Time: Breeders’ Cup Classic Futurama

Moreno after winning the Charles Town Classic in April

We’re just over three months from the biggest race left on the calendar in 2015. This year’s $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic at Keeneland Race Course has already lost California Chrome and likely Shared Belief, the two horses that sat atop the odds board when the first Futures bet was released in December by the Wynn Las Vegas.

That means that if American Pharoah remains healthy for the remainder of the year, he’ll be sitting as a heavy favorite when they enter the gate on Halloween evening for the richest race in North America. In the Wynn’s latest odds, the Triple Crown winner is a resounding 5-2 favorite over the 55 other horses listed in the future book.

Let’s take a look at some of his potential competitors, now that the top two threats are out of the picture.

Palace Malice (6-1) – The 2013 Belmont Stakes winner has not had the best 2015, and these odds seem a bit short based on the fact he’s run only once during the current year after being sidelined by injuries, a third-place effort in the Diablo. My pick in the 2013 Classic at Santa Anita needs to pick it up over the next three months to even find himself in Lexington.

Hoppertunity (10-1) – I like this son of Any Given Saturday, he was going to be my Derby pick last year before scratching out shortly after the draw. Another Baffert trainee has faced decent competition during the year and with the right progression could be the main threat to Pharoah. He’s a Grade 1 winner and is maturing as a 4-year-0ld.

Tonalist (10-1) – If you can figure this horse out, then all the power to you. After selecting east coaster Palace Malice in 2013, I followed that up with Tonalist in 2014 as my Classic pick after his super performance in the Jockey Club Gold Cup, but he flopped at Santa Anita just like Palace Malice. His 2015 performances have been an enigma, and he’s received a bad ride or two to boot. I’ll wait on his Whitney-Woodward-JCGC sequence to see if he can get back to his winning ways.

Constitution (11-1) – The Donn winner in February at Gulfstream was ready to run in the Dubai World Cup before an injury derailed his hopes. He is back on the worktab, working three furlongs in :39 1/5 on July 12 at Saratoga for trainer Todd Pletcher, so we’ll likely see his comeback race at the Spa. His current odds look fair, but we’ll get a better indication in the coming preps.

Commissioner (12-1) – After winning the G3 Pimlico Special on Black-Eyed Susan Day, he finished a disappointing sixth in the Stephen Foster H. Seems to be a cut below the better horses pointed toward the Classic and his odds at post time are likely to be much higher than 12-1.

Dortmund (12-1) – Not convinced that the son of Big Brown wants to get the mile-and-a-quarter based on his efforts in the Derby and the Preakness, although it could be the toll that the Derby trail took on him. He’s a talented colt that will win his share of races, but he’s a bigger shot than 12-1.

Frosted (15-1) – He’ll be the favorite in the Saratoga 3-year-old races based on his efforts in the Classics, as long as Pharoah doesn’t show up for the Midsummer Classic. He’s a solid horse and a future at 15-1 wouldn’t be such a bad bet, should Pharoah be sidelined before the Classic.

Firing Line (25-1) – Another 3-year-old who gave Pharoah his biggest test in the Derby, and wanted no part of the slop at Old Hilltop. I’m all over him at 25-1. The Preakness is a throw-out and a rested son of Line of David could be dangerous on a fast track at Keeneland.

Moreno (25-1) – The Charles Town Classic winner can handle the distance, is a mature horse and doesn’t fear anyone. Those are pretty juicy odds for a speed horse with stamina. Eric Guillot will have him ready for some trick-or-treating in Kentucky.

Horses I’d make a $5 future bet on at the current odds: Toast of New York (25-1); Keen Ice (60-1); Effinex (50-1)

Horses I’d take a big ole pass on: Bayern (25-1); Honor Code (15-1); Materiality (18-1); Wicked Strong (20-1)

Gene Kershner, a Buffalo-based turf writer, is a member of the National Turf Writers and Broadcasters Association, and tweets @EquiSpace.

 

Article source: http://sportsink.buffalonews.com/2015/07/17/post-time-breeders-cup-classic-futurama/

Simpsons / Futurama Crossover A Distinct Possibility: Creator Matt Groening …

Another Simpsons/Futurama crossover in the cards? You bet.

Matt Groening, creator of both The Simpsons and Futurama, had some wonderful news for fans at the recently concluded San Diego Comic Con when he admitted to the possibility of another Simpsons/Futurama crossover being likely in the near future.

Apart from Groening himself, the Ballroom 20 panel at San Diego Comic Con consisted of executive producers Al Jean and Matt Selman, supervising director Mike Anderson, long-time director David Silverman and the celebrated voice behind Bart Simpson, Nancy Cartwright. But there was someone very special present there too, according to IGN.

Guillermo Del Toro, whose latest film Crimson Peak is set for release this October, re-screened his Halloween couch gag from a couple years ago much to the delight of Simpsons fans.

When asked about the likelihood of another Simpsons/Futurama crossover, Matt Groening conceded that it remained a distinct possibility.

“It’s possible. It’s possible. What’s amazing about Futurama… Here’s a political answer. You know, the fans of Futurama are still watching the show on Netflix. You know how everything gets rebooted? Futurama will get rebooted someday. We’ll see.”

Fans will remember “Simpsorama”, the Simpsons/Futurama crossover that took place in The Simpsons time slot, at the back end of last season. By inducting the rather well-constructed sci-fi tenor of Futurama into the Simpsons‘ cynicism of consumer-culture, Groening was able to, borrowing from the episode’s lexicon, share the DNA of the two shows.

Ever since that episode, fans have been hoping that Groening will give Futurama‘s characters some more air time by bringing them to The Simpsons again.

While this may be one way of interpreting Groening’s statement, another reading could be that Futurama is ready for its own standalone reboot. Whether that means bringing in a bunch of odd-ball characters into the show, or another retro throwback into an even more distant future, remains to be seen, but by all accounts, it sounds like an exciting possibility. Cinema Blend had their own take on the possibility of another Simpsons/Futurama crossover.

“If we get another Simpsons/Futurama crossover in the meantime, that would be just as fabulous. Considering the next season of The Simpsons is presumably all mapped out and completed in one form or another, we know it won’t happen soon. But Season 28 could easily put Bender and Homer back together for more murderous hijinks. Make it happen, powers that be!”

We hope the “powers that be” are listening to us. We cannot wait for another Simpsons/Futurama crossover either.

[Photo: Claire Greenway, Michael Buckner / Getty Images]

Article source: http://www.inquisitr.com/2257445/simpsons-futurama-crossover-a-distinct-possibility-creator-matt-groening-considering-it/

‘Futurama’ Mobile Game Announcement Leaves Fans Underwhelmed

Futurama mobile game: not quite the announcement that Futurama fans were hoping for. The new Futurama mobile game, Release the Drones, was first announced way back in 2013, but details were scarce. The Futurama mobile game website allows interested parties to sign up to get more news about the upcoming mobile game, but the site doesn’t provide any other information.

There have been mixed reactions to the announcement of the newest Futurama mobile game. The most common reactions from the fans have been full of anger.

“Shut up and resurrect the series…Who wants another crappy pay to win mobile game?”

“I have seen every episode of Futurama. I do not wish to have a game. I want, no, WE want a new season.”

Many fans seem to want the series, cancelled in 2013, to be brought back instead of having a new Futurama mobile game, with most fans completely against the idea. According to SegmentNext, one motivation for the game may be that the creators of Futurama are hoping to enjoy the same sort of success as The Simpsons game Tapped Out, which has generated revenue of over $100 million to date. Although Futurama has not been around for as long as The Simpsons (currently in its 26th season), the fan base for Futurama has grown exponentially since it began.

This won’t be the first time that Futurama is attempting to break into the mobile game market, according to IB Times.

“Simply titled “Futurama,” it was a 3D platformer with cel-shaded graphics and was available on the original Microsoft Xbox and Sony PlayStation 2.”

At the moment, fans have no idea what the Futurama mobile game is really about. The picture released shows Bender pointing to the sky, but it is unclear what the gesture represents in relation to the game.

Futurama fans have been active on Twitter, with the general consensus being that fans are not excited by the news. Some fans believe that the game will be a rip-off of The Simpsons game with the Futurama characters while other fans are concerned that they will be charged to play the game.

The creators of Futurama have not announced an exact release date for the Futurama mobile game, so fans and doubters alike can only join the mailing list on the website, and then they must sit and wait for the game to be released.

[Photo: Futurama Facebook – facebook.com/Futurama]

Article source: http://www.inquisitr.com/2259661/futurama-mobile-game-announcement-leaves-fans-underwhelmed/

‘Simpsons’/'Futurama’ Crossover A Distinct Possibility: Creator Matt Groening …

Another Simpsons/Futurama crossover in the cards? You bet.

Matt Groening, creator of both The Simpsons and Futurama, had some wonderful news for fans at the recently concluded San Diego Comic Con when he admitted to the possibility of another Simpsons/Futurama crossover being likely in the near future.

Apart from Groening himself, the Ballroom 20 panel at San Diego Comic Con consisted of executive producers Al Jean and Matt Selman, supervising director Mike Anderson, long-time director David Silverman and the celebrated voice behind Bart Simpson, Nancy Cartwright. But there was someone very special present there too, according to IGN.

Guillermo Del Toro, whose latest film Crimson Peak is set for release this October, re-screened his Halloween couch gag from a couple years ago much to the delight of Simpsons fans.

When asked about the likelihood of another Simpsons/Futurama crossover, Matt Groening conceded that it remained a distinct possibility.

“It’s possible. It’s possible. What’s amazing about Futurama… Here’s a political answer. You know, the fans of Futurama are still watching the show on Netflix. You know how everything gets rebooted? Futurama will get rebooted someday. We’ll see.”

Fans will remember “Simpsorama”, the Simpsons/Futurama crossover that took place in The Simpsons time slot, at the back end of last season. By inducting the rather well-constructed sci-fi tenor of Futurama into the Simpsons‘ cynicism of consumer-culture, Groening was able to, borrowing from the episode’s lexicon, share the DNA of the two shows.

Ever since that episode, fans have been hoping that Groening will give Futurama‘s characters some more air time by bringing them to The Simpsons again.

While this may be one way of interpreting Groening’s statement, another reading could be that Futurama is ready for its own standalone reboot. Whether that means bringing in a bunch of odd-ball characters into the show, or another retro throwback into an even more distant future, remains to be seen, but by all accounts, it sounds like an exciting possibility. Cinema Blend had their own take on the possibility of another Simpsons/Futurama crossover.

“If we get another Simpsons/Futurama crossover in the meantime, that would be just as fabulous. Considering the next season of The Simpsons is presumably all mapped out and completed in one form or another, we know it won’t happen soon. But Season 28 could easily put Bender and Homer back together for more murderous hijinks. Make it happen, powers that be!”

We hope the “powers that be” are listening to us. We cannot wait for another Simpsons/Futurama crossover either.

[Photo: Claire Greenway, Michael Buckner / Getty Images]

Article source: http://www.inquisitr.com/2257445/simpsons-futurama-crossover-a-distinct-possibility-creator-matt-groening-considering-it/

Futurama Mobile Game Announcement Leaves Fans Underwhelmed

Futurama mobile game: not quite the announcement that Futurama fans were hoping for. The new Futurama mobile game, Release the Drones, was first announced way back in 2013, but details were scarce. The Futurama mobile game website allows interested parties to sign up to get more news about the upcoming mobile game, but the site doesn’t provide any other information.

There have been mixed reactions to the announcement of the newest Futurama mobile game. The most common reactions from the fans have been full of anger.

“Shut up and resurrect the series…Who wants another crappy pay to win mobile game?”

“I have seen every episode of Futurama. I do not wish to have a game. I want, no, WE want a new season.”

Many fans seem to want the series, cancelled in 2013, to be brought back instead of having a new Futurama mobile game, with most fans completely against the idea. According to SegmentNext, one motivation for the game may be that the creators of Futurama are hoping to enjoy the same sort of success as The Simpsons game Tapped Out, which has generated revenue of over $100 million to date. Although Futurama has not been around for as long as The Simpsons (currently in its 26th season), the fan base for Futurama has grown exponentially since it began.

This won’t be the first time that Futurama is attempting to break into the mobile game market, according to IB Times.

“Simply titled “Futurama,” it was a 3D platformer with cel-shaded graphics and was available on the original Microsoft Xbox and Sony PlayStation 2.”

At the moment, fans have no idea what the Futurama mobile game is really about. The picture released shows Bender pointing to the sky, but it is unclear what the gesture represents in relation to the game.

Futurama fans have been active on Twitter, with the general consensus being that fans are not excited by the news. Some fans believe that the game will be a rip-off of The Simpsons game with the Futurama characters while other fans are concerned that they will be charged to play the game.

The creators of Futurama have not announced an exact release date for the Futurama mobile game, so fans and doubters alike can only join the mailing list on the website, and then they must sit and wait for the game to be released.

[Photo: Futurama Facebook – facebook.com/Futurama]

Article source: http://www.inquisitr.com/2259661/futurama-mobile-game-announcement-leaves-fans-underwhelmed/

Chart: The 8 actors that voiced more than 200 Futurama characters – Vox

The futuristic space-set cartoon Futurama built a large stable of characters over the seven seasons that it aired (as well as in its four movies). And 202 of them were voiced by just eight people:

The many voices of Futurama (Phil Edwards/Vox)

Those actors in the main cast include Billy West (Fry, Professor Farnsworth, Zapp Brannigan, Doctor Zoidberg), Katey Sagal (Leela), John DiMaggio (Bender), Tress MacNeille (Mom), Maurice LaMarche (Kif Kroker), Lauren Tom (Amy Wong), Phil LaMarr (Hermes), and David Herman (Scruffy).

Some key observations from looking at the chart:

  • Billy West, the most famous Futurama voice, did several main characters including Fry and Professor Farnsworth. Still, he didn’t voice the most characters.
  • On the flip side, look at Tress MacNeille! She voiced at least 46 characters on the show, but her major character, Mom, is probably less prominent than many others. That shows the invisible nature of voice acting — the most prolific actor on a single show may not be the most famous.
  • The actors with the most established non-voice acting careers voiced the fewest characters. Phil LaMarr, Lauren Tom, and Katey Sagal probably had the most well-established non-voice acting careers. They also voiced the fewest characters. David Herman breaks the trend — he played Michael Bolton in Office Space (1999), but he still voiced at least 37 characters and is more established as a voice actor.

Note: There are some key decisions that come with making a chart so vast. We omitted some “alternate universe” characters like Alternate Farnswoth and Alternate Fry, and we left out Flexo, too. Minor characters are probably overrepresented, and, in truth, a few may have slipped through the cracks — this chart is largely based on the work of dedicated fans at the Futurama Wikia, to which we owe great thanks.

Read more: What 11 famous voice actors — from Homer Simpson to Siri — really look like

Article source: http://www.vox.com/2015/7/17/8989959/futurama-voices-actors