The ‘Simpsons’/'Futurama’ crossover: Two great tastes that go pretty well together

How I love Futurama! Matt Groening’s other show never had the audience or the acclaim of The Simpsons. It aired sporadically for four seasons, frequently shifting timeslots in an era when “timeslots” were things that people cared about. But eventually people found Futurama: In reruns on adult swim, on DVD when DVDs were things that people cared about. And what they found was a show that was somehow both darker and sillier than its more famous older sibling. The Simpsons is a family show about characters who fundamentally love each other, living in a vividly drawn cartoon city; Futurama is a workplace sitcom about characters who frequently can’t stand each other, living in a multiverse built on flotsam and jetsam from centuries’ worth of far-flung space fantasy.

After being revived by Comedy Central in 2008, Futurama ended again last September—but nobody thought it was really finished. Any TV show that was ever a TV show feels like a  going concern now. Which probably explains why the Simpsons/Futurama crossover didn’t even try to be a momentous occasion. There was no sense that this could be the last time we see characters like Bender, Fry, or Leela. Last month’s Family Guy/Simpsons crossover had a mission statement, a clear undercurrent of trying hard to be an ultimate statement about two very different shows. “Simpsorama” just wanted to get to the scene where Bender hangs out with Homer at Moe’s.

The best jokes were all in the episode’s first half. Bender falls through some kind of timehole and lands in Springfield, circa Right Now. He drinks with Homer, bowls with Homer, drinks with Homer some more. There was a meta-joke about how Bender is just Homer with an antenna. But where “The Simpsons Guy” fell down the meta-rabbit hole, “Simpsorama” mostly settled for simple gags, with a hit ratio that was better than Futurama season 6 but not quite up to the standards of Futurama season 5.

At first; the episode tilted on the revelation that Bender had been sent back in time to kill Homer, because the future of Futurama is under attack by demonic rabbits, a couple of which look exactly like the protagonists of Groening’s comic strip Life in Hell. In a weird way, the crossover felt overplotted: The Futurama folk think that Homer is to blame, then Bart, then everyone gets sent to the future, then Lisa saves the day with an elaborate scheme involving Madison Cube Garden. (Few shows were better at stupid puns than Futurama.)

The episode had a plethora of easter eggs for Futurama fans (the dog!) and got a couple of decent laughs out of the interaction of the two casts. My favorite gag: Marge greeting Leela, trying really hard not to talk about Leela’s eye; Leela, greeting marge, trying really hard not to talk about Marge’s hair. Futurama always leant itself to the hyper-engaged internet-age viewer, and we can start discussing how seriously to take the minor-major revelations of the episode’s ending. (Is Ralph Wiggum really dying in 2017? Are Kang and Kodos both women, and is their last name Johnson?)

I’d be intrigued to know what die-hard Futurama fans thought of the show. The episode was very Bender-centric, until it became very Professor-centric; initial series protagonists Fry and Leela got much less screen time. In a sense, this reflects the scruffy charm of Futurama. (Yeesh, this is a show with a character named Scruffy.) The show had off-moments and vaguely-defined characters, but it also had a genuine ambition to match the best and craziest science-fiction. At the end of “Simpsorama,” Bender decided to take the long way back to the 31st Century, going into hibernation mode in the Simpsons’ basement. It’s a weird and lovely little grace note; Futurama always felt (feels?) like a series hiding in pop culture’s basement, a buried treasure waiting to get activated.

“Simpsorama” wasn’t a great episode of The Simpsons or of Futurama, but it was a lovely little celebration, a tip of the hat from the class president to the kid who spends lunch breaks inventing new rules for Dungeons Dragons. Also, Homer twisted the necks off of little green Bart mutants, which isn’t nothing.

Article source: http://popwatch.ew.com/2014/11/09/the-simpsons-futurama-crossover/

‘Simpsons’-'Futurama’ cross-over tops Sunday ratings

Good news everyone: The Simpsons’ crossover with the dearly departed Futurama topped all broadcast entertainment shows in the ratings Sunday night.

About 6.6 million viewers tuned in, with a 2.9 rating among adults 18-49, edging out second-place finisher ABC’s Once Upon a Time (7.4 million, 2.5) in the demo. Granted, that’s nowhere close to the Simpsons and Family Guy crossover that kicked off the season. (That hour-long episode was a 4.5 in the demo.) But the move still spiked Simpsons‘ ratings by 45 percent from last week.

Also Sunday: Fox’s freshman comedy Mulaney (0.9) is still struggling, CBS’ veteran procedural CSI (1.2) dipped to a series low and new drama Madam Secretary (1.4) tied its low. ABC’s Revenge (1.3) hit a modest season high.

UPDATE: Obviously the biggest entertainment show across broadcast and cable was AMC’s The Walking Dead -- 13.5 million viewers and a 4.6 rating.

The ‘Simpsons’/'Futurama’ crossover: Two great tastes that go pretty well together

How I love Futurama! Matt Groening’s other show never had the audience or the acclaim of The Simpsons. It aired sporadically for four seasons, frequently shifting timeslots in an era when “timeslots” were things that people cared about. But eventually people found Futurama: In reruns on adult swim, on DVD when DVDs were things that people cared about. And what they found was a show that was somehow both darker and sillier than its more famous older sibling. The Simpsons is a family show about characters who fundamentally love each other, living in a vividly drawn cartoon city; Futurama is a workplace sitcom about characters who frequently can’t stand each other, living in a multiverse built on flotsam and jetsam from centuries’ worth of far-flung space fantasy.

After being revived by Comedy Central in 2008, Futurama ended again last September—but nobody thought it was really finished. Any TV show that was ever a TV show feels like a  going concern now. Which probably explains why the Simpsons/Futurama crossover didn’t even try to be a momentous occasion. There was no sense that this could be the last time we see characters like Bender, Fry, or Leela. Last month’s Family Guy/Simpsons crossover had a mission statement, a clear undercurrent of trying hard to be an ultimate statement about two very different shows. “Simpsorama” just wanted to get to the scene where Bender hangs out with Homer at Moe’s.

The best jokes were all in the episode’s first half. Bender falls through some kind of timehole and lands in Springfield, circa Right Now. He drinks with Homer, bowls with Homer, drinks with Homer some more. There was a meta-joke about how Bender is just Homer with an antenna. But where “The Simpsons Guy” fell down the meta-rabbit hole, “Simpsorama” mostly settled for simple gags, with a hit ratio that was better than Futurama season 6 but not quite up to the standards of Futurama season 5.

At first; the episode tilted on the revelation that Bender had been sent back in time to kill Homer, because the future of Futurama is under attack by demonic rabbits, a couple of which look exactly like the protagonists of Groening’s comic strip Life in Hell. In a weird way, the crossover felt overplotted: The Futurama folk think that Homer is to blame, then Bart, then everyone gets sent to the future, then Lisa saves the day with an elaborate scheme involving Madison Cube Garden. (Few shows were better at stupid puns than Futurama.)

The episode had a plethora of easter eggs for Futurama fans (the dog!) and got a couple of decent laughs out of the interaction of the two casts. My favorite gag: Marge greeting Leela, trying really hard not to talk about Leela’s eye; Leela, greeting marge, trying really hard not to talk about Marge’s hair. Futurama always leant itself to the hyper-engaged internet-age viewer, and we can start discussing how seriously to take the minor-major revelations of the episode’s ending. (Is Ralph Wiggum really dying in 2017? Are Kang and Kodos both women, and is their last name Johnson?)

I’d be intrigued to know what die-hard Futurama fans thought of the show. The episode was very Bender-centric, until it became very Professor-centric; initial series protagonists Fry and Leela got much less screen time. In a sense, this reflects the scruffy charm of Futurama. (Yeesh, this is a show with a character named Scruffy.) The show had off-moments and vaguely-defined characters, but it also had a genuine ambition to match the best and craziest science-fiction. At the end of “Simpsorama,” Bender decided to take the long way back to the 31st Century, going into hibernation mode in the Simpsons’ basement. It’s a weird and lovely little grace note; Futurama always felt (feels?) like a series hiding in pop culture’s basement, a buried treasure waiting to get activated.

“Simpsorama” wasn’t a great episode of The Simpsons or of Futurama, but it was a lovely little celebration, a tip of the hat from the class president to the kid who spends lunch breaks inventing new rules for Dungeons Dragons. Also, Homer twisted the necks off of little green Bart mutants, which isn’t nothing.

Article source: http://popwatch.ew.com/2014/11/09/the-simpsons-futurama-crossover/

‘The Simpsons’/'Futurama’ Crossover: Springfield Gets a Blast From the Future

THE SIMPSONS: In a special crossover episode, Futurama’s Planet Express crew comes to present-day Springfield to …

Futurama references have been sprinkled throughout The Simpsons for years, but at long last, the crossover fans have dreamed of — and possibly tapped their foot impatiently for — has happened. Tonight’s “Simpsorama” episode gives fans of the late sci-fi cartoon everything they could have hoped for (short of another season).

Meanwhile, The Simpsons has had dozens (hundreds?) of guest stars, but only a handful of crossovers. It’s a tricky business: too little of the guest show, and it’s just a cameo; too much, and it no longer feels like The Simpsons. The best examples are Jay Sherman from The Critic appearing in Season 6′s “A Star Is Burns,” and The X-Files‘s Mulder and Scully investigating an alien in “The Springfield Files” from Season 8. Like a lot of this season, “Simpsorama” is very funny, if not particularly inspired.

Watch the couch gag from tonight’s Simpsons/Futurama crossover right here:

Despite their similar animation styles and the fact that both shows were co-created by Matt Groening, The Simpsons and Futurama are actually starkly different. Futurama is a much darker show, capable of sharper satirical jabs because of its strange future setting.

Related: The Best. Episodes. Ever. For 55 ‘Simpsons’ Characters

Case in point: this sequence, which mocks the cold corporate heart behind some of our beloved entertainment institutions.

Marge: I thought people in future would be more full of peace and love — like Epcot Center.
Leela: In our time, Epcot Center is a work camp for the weak.
Professor: Oh, but it’s not as crowded as the slave labor camps at Universal Studios.

The plot of the episode is simple: Bart’s time-capsule prank results in a horde of mutant Bart-goblins destroying New New York a thousand years from now. Bender is sent back in time to kill Homer (owing to a DNA mix-up), but they bond instead.

THE SIMPSONS: In a special crossover episode, Futurama’s Planet Express crew comes to present-day Springfield to …

The show has a lot of fun with the bond between Homer and Bender. Or, as they say:

Homer: What’s the robot version of bromance?
Bender: Romance.
Homer: You future guys have a word for everything.

It’s the sibling connection Bart and Lisa share that proves key to defeating the goblins. In the future, Lisa’s years of manipulating Bart pay off as she lures them to Madison Cube Garden by telling them it’s full of people laying fingers on Butterfingers — referring to those ubiquitous commercials from the ’90s.

Many Futurama favorites get a moment of screen time; Dr. Zoidberg calls out the artificiality of it early on: “Hello, robot! Looks like everybody gets a turn to say something! This concludes my time.” Gruff janitor Scruffy’s death is once again teased. It turns out that he’s just lost his mustache, “but,” he says, “life without a mustache ain’t worth living,” and promptly disintegrates his head.

THE SIMPSONS: In a special crossover episode, Futurama’s Planet Express crew comes to present-day Springfield to …

Fortunately, the glimpse of Seymour the dog still in front of Panucci’s is brief enough that there isn’t time to get teary-eyed. Anyone who quibbles that they’re in Springfield and not New York, where Fry’s loyal dog waits for him in the classic Futurama episode “Jurassic Bark,” doesn’t deserve to be called a fan.

Related: 17 GIFs of Things ‘Futurama’ Did Better Than Anyone Else

The best and most unexpected pairing of the episode is Kang and Kodos coming to Lrrr and Ndnd’s planet for a dinner party where we learn that not only are the Simpsons aliens both female (nitpickers might point out they’ve been established as brother and sister in past episodes, but they probably change sexes like amphibians), but that their last name is Johnson.

The last minute features a Simpsons-ized version of the Futurama opening credits. Here are most of the things worth seeing:

1) The Lard Lad Donuts statue is the same species as Morbo
2) Buzz Cola now has cocaine again
3) The Blinky-shaped flying car
4) The Android’s Penthouse — take me to your comic books and baseball cards
5) Duff Holobeer — all of the rage, none of the calories
6) Diamond Joe Quimby is still up for re-election — or at least his head is
7) Milhouse of Ill Repute
8) Kang and Kodos 8-Tentacle Massage
9) Professor Frink’s Carbon Dating Service
10) Stonecutters World HQ
11) Can anybody read the alien writing behind Jimbo and Kearney as they’re lasering off the head of Jebediah Springfield?
12) Ralph Wiggum 2006-2017
13) Moe’s Unfriendly Bar
14) The Tesla Building
15) The eBook of Mormon
16) Scruffy’s headless body sweeping up debris in the street

Did we miss anything? How do you think this crossover stacked up against the others? Let us know below.

The Simpsons airs Sundays at 8 p.m. on Fox.

Article source: https://tv.yahoo.com/blogs/tv-news/simpsons-futurama-crossover-003021635.html

Simpsons/Futurama Crossover: Homer Teams up With Bender, Fry and Leela …

The much awaited Simpsons/Futurama crossover episode airs on Sunday, 9 November, at 8pm on Fox.

The Planet Express gang from Matt Groening’s sci-fi animated show Futurama shows up in present Springfield from the 31st century to save the future.

The episode is titled Simpsorama, and the crossover will unwind a complex Terminator-esque story that involves “Bart blowing his nose on a sandwich that he places in a time capsule. When that mixes with Milhouse’s rabbit’s foot and some radioactive ooze, it creates a global catastrophe in the future, prompting Bender to travel back in time to kill Bart and prevent this mega-mess.”

Click here to watch the episode online.

The tagline reads “a show out of ideas teaming up with a show out of episodes”.

The Simpsons executive producer Al Jean has said that a crossover with Futurama will “please fans of both” shows.

Futurama aired its final episode in September in the US, and Jean insisted that the upcoming episode is not intended to undermine that show’s ending.

“It was a really good ending and this doesn’t purport to re-end it,” Jean told Digital Spy.

“If you asked me, I’d say this crossover takes place three months before [the finale] occurred. I would never dream of trying to replace that ending.”

Jean admitted that he is “really excited” about the crossover.

“[We knew] Futurama was probably going off the air – though you never know, that show always comes back,” he said.

“So we thought it’d be great to see those characters one more time and to have those voices come to our show.”

The Family guy team from Quohog visited the Simpsons earlier this year, where Homer and Peter bonded when the Griffins family found themselves stranded in Springfield.

Watch all the promos here

Article source: http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/simpsons-futurama-crossover-episode-homer-teams-bender-fry-leela-where-watch-simpsorama-1473879

The Simpsons-Futurama Crossover: Not a Classic, But Beats Family Guy

FOX

A weird half-hour celebrates the Matt Groening shows’ shared DNA.

Article source: http://time.com/3572757/simpsons-futurama-crossover-review/

TV Blog Buzz: When Bart met Bender, ‘Simpsons’ meets ‘Futurama’ in crossover …

First it was “Family Guy,” now “The Simpsons” is teaming up with “Futurama” for a special crossover episode.

Bart meets Bender and company in this week’s show and Entertainment Weekly has posted a 30-second teaser, along with the “Simpsorama” episode’s couch gag. The show’s first joke is a caption that reads: “A show out of ideas teams up with a show out of episodes.”

“The Simpsons” executive producer Al Jean told Entertainment Weekly that Matt Groening, who created both cartoon comedies, was up for the idea of a crossover after “Futurama” wrapped up for good last year.

“They were going off the air, so I thought people would really love it if we had one more chance to see those characters,” Jean said.

“We’re always looking for things that are compatible with us, and I thought, ‘Well, what’s more compatible?’ We do a joke, actually, about how similar Bender and Homer look. Like, they just erased Homer’s hair.”

http://bit.ly/1xqjm0s

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Jerry Seinfeld shared something surprisingly personal during a recent interview with anchor Brian Williams on “NBC Nightly News.”

The comic, who is seen in the segment performing at small little clubs in New York, says he relates to some of the symptoms associated with autism.

“I think, on a very drawn-out scale, I think I’m on the spectrum,” Seinfeld says.

When asked why he thinks that, he replies: “You’re never paying attention to the right things. Basic social engagement is really a struggle. I’m very literal, when people talk to me and they use expressions, sometimes I don’t know what they’re saying. But I don’t see it as dysfunctional. I just think of it as an alternate mindset.”

http://nbcnews.to/1EbNONT

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The International Paruresis Association has a problem with Rob Lowe and the satellite television company DirecTV.

In a DirecTV commercial, Lowe plays two versions of himself: a slick, suave satellite TV spokesman and a exaggeratedly awkward cable TV customer.

In the commercial, the uber-dorky Lowe admits he has a problem using public washrooms due to nerves.

That’s where the International Paruresis Association — which estimates that seven per cent of the U.S. population suffers from being “pee shy” or having “shy or bashful bladder” — objects.

Today.com reports that members of the association are calling for the ad to be pulled.

But DirecTV is refusing, and on his Twitter account, Lowe said: “For those wondering, my bladder is gregarious.”

http://on.today.com/1wCEEJZ

Article source: http://www.news1130.com/2014/11/09/tv-blog-buzz-when-bart-met-bender-simpsons-meets-futurama-in-crossover-episode/

Sneak peek at The Simpsons and Futurama crossover

New pictures have been released of The Simpsons’ Futurama crossover, which is on TV later this week.

The Planet Express crew from the 31st century is scheduled to touch down in present-day Springfield on 9 November in an episode called Simpsorama.

The main voice cast from the now cancelled Futurama will return.

In the episode Bender travels back in time to stop Bart from doing something that leads to a catastrophe.

“Bender has to come back from the future to kill Bart because there’s something that Bart does now that makes the future really, really, really bad,” says Simpsons executive producer Al Jean.

Speaking at the announcement of the crossover last year Jean said: “Futurama is such an easy fit.

“It’s really funny, and their show lends itself to any variety of plot lines. By having them on, we have a little freedom.

“We do a joke, actually, about how similar Bender and Homer look. Like, they just erased Homer’s hair.”

And there’s a special hidden treat for fans of both shows in the title sequence.

“There’s a thing in Futurama code where if you solve it, it says, ‘Congratulations! You’re a nerd,’” says Jean.

It’s the second crossover episode of the year that involves The Simpsons after the Griffin family from Family Guy were sent to Springfield.

The episode will premiere on Fox on 9 November.

Follow @BBCNewsbeat on Twitter and Radio1Newsbeat on YouTube

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/29929151

The Simpsons: "Simpsorama" Review



November 9, 2014

Note: This is an advance review of the Simpsons/Futurama crossover episode, which airs tonight at 8/7c on FOX. No major spoilers follow.

Not since the days of Hanna-Barbera have two animated shows been more ripe for crossover than The Simpsons and Futurama, even with a some-odd millennium separating the two. Thus, it was probably only a matter of time (literally) before the Planet Express crew paid a visit to the Simpsons family in the 21st century. For Futurama fans, The Simpsons’ sixth episode in Season 26, “Simpsorama,” marks a highly anticipated return for Fry, Leela, Bender and the rest of the crew, whose own adventures came to an end (again) last year on Comedy Central.

Simpsons World: Every Single Episode in One App

However, seeing as how this is a Simpsons episode and not a Futurama one, the crossover naturally begins in present-day Springfield. Unlike the hour-long Simpsons/Family Guy episode earlier this year, “Simpsorama” (which is only a half-hour) doesn’t waste any time in getting to the crossover stuff. Without spoiling anything, the main storyline of “Simpsorama” is a bit dull, especially considering some of Futurama’s more epic storylines. Really, the character dynamics are the big draw for this episode, particularly between Homer and Bender who, as you might expect, hit it off almost immediately when the Planet Express crew arrives in Springfield.

That said, the other character pairings aren’t quite as strong, unlike in the Family Guy crossover. To the writers’ credit, they try to stir something up between Marge and Leela and Lisa and the Professor, but this only results in a few amusing jokes. There’s also the odd addition of Professor Frink, whose role here is more convoluted than practical.

Eventually, the Simpsons clan gets sucked into the future, but the time spent here is all too short. As a result, the 31st century scenes are distinctly lacking in Futurama characters, with only a scant few lines from Zoidberg, Hermes and Amy — and no Zapp Brannigan whatsoever. (Heresy, I say!) With the Simpsons spending such a short amount of time in New New York, this episode probably would have benefitted from a longer running time.

IGN’s Simpsons/Family Guy Crossover Review

Overall, I’d say “Simpsorama” is a solid crossover, but again there just isn’t enough time to really explore the different character interactions. Still, the episode features plenty of fun nods for Futurama fans, in addition to a solid conclusion. In the end, I think most viewers will be pleased with the Planet Express crew’s postscript outing.

Article source: http://www.ign.com/articles/2014/11/09/the-simpsons-simpsorama-review